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Highland Lakes cities continue to see an uptick in local sales tax revenues. The following data reflects reports submitted from the Texas Comptroller’s Office in January 2022, which represent sales activity from two months prior. 

MARBLE FALLS

In November 2021, Marble Falls brought in 24.75 percent more in sales tax revenues compared to November 2020.

  • November 2021: $1,056,992.86
  • November 2020: $847,265.85
  • Year-to-date sales tax revenues distributed by January 2022: 1,056,992.86, up 24.75 percent from last year

BURNET

In November 2021, Burnet brought in 18.57 percent more in sales tax revenues compared to November 2020. 

  • November 2021: $288,408.78
  • November 2020: $243,230.06
  • Year-to-date sales tax revenues distributed by January 2022: $288,408.78, up 18.57 percent from last year

GRANITE SHOALS

In November 2021, Granite Shoals brought in 15.18 percent more in sales tax revenues compared to November 2020.

  • November 2021: $37,503.96  
  • November 2020: $32,560.96
  • Year-to-date sales tax revenues distributed by January 2022: $37,503.96, up 15.18 percent from last year

HORSESHOE BAY

In November 2021, Horseshoe Bay brought in 19.66 percent more in sales tax revenues compared to November 2020. 

  • November 2021: $152,520.55  
  • November 2020: $127,452.00
  • Year-to-date sales tax revenues distributed by January 2022: $152,520.55, up 19.66 percent from last year 

COTTONWOOD SHORES

In November 2021, Cottonwood Shores brought in 44.37 percent more in sales tax revenues compared to November 2020.

  • November 2021: $26,216.84 
  • November 2020: $18,158.40
  • Year-to-date sales tax revenues distributed by January 2022: $26,216.84, up 44.37 percent from last year 

editor@thepicayune.com

1 thought on “Sales tax revenues for November 2021

  1. I’m not sure November 2021 can be compared to November 2020 in term of sales considering the prices almost doubled in that year time frame. Less items were actually sold, they just cost more, causing the taxes to be higher.

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