New Marble Falls housing development closer to construction

STAFF WRITER JARED FIELDS

Gregg Ranch development

Aerial rendering of the Gregg Ranch development. Courtesy of Harvard Investments

Financing for a Public Improvement District on 242 acres of the Gregg Ranch development is edging closer to reality.

The Marble Falls City Council on May 21 approved setting public hearings at future meetings, and three more items related to the development will be on the council’s June 4 regular agenda.

A PID is an area established to provide public improvements financed by property owners within the district.

The Gregg Ranch development is located south of Texas 71 on the west side of US 281. Over the course of nine years and seven phases, the developers anticipate building 707 single-family residential lots and 522 multi-family units.

Should the financing plan be approved by the city and bonds be sold this summer, the first phase of construction is expected to begin this fall.

Planned amenities in the development include a swimming pool, a splash pad, a playground, a gazebo, a multi-use sports field, hiking and biking trails, and about 12 acres of parkland.

Public improvements will include water and wastewater line extensions, three water retention ponds, improvements to US 281, and street lighting.

In bond documents attached to the June 4 meeting, the developers state lots will be 50-, 60-, and 70-feet wide with average home prices starting between $253,125 and $303,975.

The Gregg Ranch development is the first, but not the only, development proposed for that area of Marble Falls. Potential developments at Live Oak Village, Roper Ranch, and Flatrock Springs could materialize in the coming months, or years.

jared@thepicayune.com

12 Responses to “New Marble Falls housing development closer to construction”

  1. Lee says:

    What can we do to get rid of this!!! Do not want do not need marble falls and their crap closer …..

  2. Getitright says:

    Real smart!!! Gregg Ranch and the city of Marble Falls officials ran off a company paying a living family wage that could qualify for a $250,000 – $300,000 home loan, but pats itself on the back for bringing in 100 fast food lower wage jobs, that would have trouble qualifying for the same size home loans. Now Gregg Ranch is back begging for dollars to pay for improvements that the developer should be paying for. This is progress?

  3. Seriously.. says:

    Because there’s not enough traffic now without any turn lanes or shoulders AND speed limit is 75. This is getting ridiculous. Who decides this stuff??? Unreal!

    • cdb says:

      just what you DON’T need…massively increased traffic flow at the 71/281 interchange. Just say NO.

    • NotJustHypocritical says:

      Who decides this stuff? When you load council with real estate people and mayor who sell materials to the builders and developers…then promote your limited experienced development services figurehead to assistant city manager…then everyone like the bringing in fast food jobs, are only interested in the quick flashy cover of the book, not bothering to write the rest of the book. What do you expect? Let us taxpayers foot the bill for a useless convention center hotel, let us pay for features that advertise awesomeness for the developer, but are off limuts to the rest of the city. Who decides this stuff? We do…low interest and low voter turnout out let’s them keep running it anyway they want while everyone forgets how outraged they when they posted it on social media.

  4. Les Fenter says:

    Hmmm. Marble Falls is and will continue to be growing. We are short on housing. Don’t be too critical until you find out what else is going on in multi family dwellings. Most of us who are not native to MF want it to stay like it was when we moved here. I recall a blinking yellow light at 281 & 1431. And loved to show the kids Rattle Snakes at the sporting goods store about where Double Horn is now. I congratulate our mayor, our city Council and our economic development Corporation. They put in a tremendous amount of time and energy into guiding our little town into the future. And, “the future is now “.

    • Steve says:

      There is not a shortage of housing. I see rent signs all over town. Many properties are for sale. If there was a true shortage the hotels would be filled with the people who are on a waiting list to buy one or rent a place. And new apartment complexes have been built. Panther hollow has units available.
      And the future is not now. That is after the now.

  5. Steve says:

    The city loves to approve these conceptual planned neighborhoods but can’t seem to find away to actually get them the to materialize. This article mentions Flatrock springs development which is a classic example of a conceptual planned neighborhood which has yet to materialize. As matter of fact it went to foreclosure and the land is for sale. The areas of mfs that have water and sewer line infrastructure in place already should be where the city and developers focus their attention of building. East side of mazano mile is ready to connect to this infrastructure. Heck there are 50 plus lots in LaVentana waiting on a home to be built on.

  6. Ronald Benge says:

    Just beautiful! Ignore the token street “repairs”
    – “we don’t have any money in the budget” – but throw $$$ at developers. If the city wants to pay for amenities, how about starting with the current residents? 😞

  7. George says:

    50, 60, 70-foot lots? Sounds like a high-priced, glorified mobile home park.

    • Steve says:

      Those 50 foot lots will be tighter than mobile home lots once the 300k homes get built on them and they are so close you can reach out the window and shake your neighbors hand. Or one side of your house becomes the fence seperating you from your neighbors house.

  8. Justin Torres says:

    Has the information on the builder been announced? If not, when?

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