LCRA: Lake LBJ reopens Nov. 17; boaters should use caution due to submerged hazards

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Lake LBJ will reopen to the public at noon Saturday, Nov. 17, according to the Lower Colorado River Authority. Lake LBJ boaters are asked to reduce speeds and use extra caution because of submerged hazards that might be difficult to see. This sandbar in the middle of Lake LBJ in Kingsland is a new one created since the Oct. 16 flood. Staff photo by Jared Fields

Lake LBJ will reopen to the public at noon Saturday, Nov. 17, according to the Lower Colorado River Authority. Lake LBJ boaters are asked to reduce speeds and use extra caution because of submerged hazards that might be difficult to see. This sandbar in the middle of Lake LBJ in Kingsland is a new one created since the Oct. 16 flood. Staff photo by Jared Fields

One month after historic flooding in the Highland Lakes, the Lower Colorado River Authority announced Nov. 16 that Lake LBJ will finally reopen to public use.

Lake LBJ reopens at noon Saturday, Nov. 17, according to the LCRA.

The LCRA asks boaters to reduce speeds and use extra caution “as submerged hazards may be difficult to see, especially at night.”

Inks Lake as well as lakes Buchanan, Marble Falls, and Travis are all open.

All floodgates along the Highland Lakes are closed. The final open floodgates at Mansfield and Tom Millers dams were closed Nov. 7.

The lowering of lakes LBJ and Marble Falls begins Dec. 30 for maintenance and repairs. The lakes will be lowered for about eight weeks. Lake LBJ was last lowered in 2017, and Lake Marble Falls in 2009. No lake drawdowns occurred from 2012-16 because of drought.

About 26,000 acre-feet of water from Lake Buchanan will be used to refill the two lakes. When full, Lake Buchanan holds just over 875,000 acre-feet of water. As of Nov. 16, the lake was 95 percent full with 832,540 acre-feet of water.

jared@thepicayune.com

One Response to “LCRA: Lake LBJ reopens Nov. 17; boaters should use caution due to submerged hazards”

  1. Barbara Blackwood says:

    Is the LCRA planning to remove the debris, the huge sandbar, or ” submerged hazards”? There are probably boats leaking fuel and oil in there, great for water quality. Since they control all the waterways they should be taking care of the debris.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks


Leave a Reply

 

Sign Up For Our Newsletter