Marble Falls council discusses Avenue N bridge, wastewater treatment plant expansion

STAFF WRITER JARED FIELDS

The city of Marble Falls’s wastewater treatment plant is operating at 75 percent of capacity. According to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the city must begin planning and designing for expansion. The city approved a contract for engineering services and has a timetable for future construction to begin in 2021. Staff photo by Jared Fields

The city of Marble Falls’s wastewater treatment plant is operating at 75 percent of capacity. According to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the city must begin planning and designing for expansion. The city approved a contract for engineering services and has a timetable for future construction to begin in 2021. Staff photo by Jared Fields

The city of Marble Falls is eyeing a possible partnership with the city of Meadowlakes to apply for a federal grant to build a bridge on Avenue N.

Marble Falls officials could present the idea of the two entities applying for a Federal Emergency Management Agency grant to the City Council within the next month, according City Manager Mike Hodge.

The bridge would cross Backbone Creek near the Huber Engineered Materials facility. Currently, a low-water crossing provides drivers a way over the creek, but flooding concerns have officials looking at a bridge.

During its regular March 19 meeting, the City Council also voted 5-0 to contract for engineering services for the development of a master plan study for the wastewater treatment plant.

The contracted engineer is Alan Plummer Associates Inc. The contract is for $91,470.

According to the city, the current plant is operating at 75 percent capacity, which requires, per the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, that planning and design begin for expansion. Construction is mandated by TCEQ at 90 percent capacity.

The plant is operating as designed, but the city’s growth is requiring officials begin planning for expansion.

The city’s estimated timetable shows planning and design to last until the middle of 2021 and construction to begin in the later months of 2021.

Based on the city’s rate of growth, the city expects to reach 90 percent capacity within five years.

The full scope of work is available on the city’s meeting agenda.

jared@thepicayune.com

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