Burnet County disaster declaration, burn ban remain due to wildfires, dry conditions

STAFF WRITER JARED FIELDS

A wildfire forced the evacuation of Inks Lake State Park and nearby homes on CR 114 to Park Road 4 in Burnet County. Courtesy photo

A wildfire that started July 29 forced the evacuation of Inks Lake State Park and nearby homes on CR 114 to Park Road 4 in Burnet County. Courtesy photo

BURNET — Burnet County remains under a Declaration of Disaster and outdoor burn ban as hot, dry conditions continue after two major wildfires.

Burnet County Judge James Oakley made the declaration July 30, a day after the Park Road 4 fire began. In a special commissioners court meeting Aug. 7, a 4-0 vote continued the declaration for the time being.

Herb Darling, development services director for Burnet County, spoke in front of the commissioners (Precinct 2 Commissioner Russell Graeter was not present) in favor of the ban.

“We do have a chance for rain at the end of the week,” he said. “So we may be able to come in next Tuesday (during the regular meeting) and revert back.”

Oakley said during the meeting that response to the declaration had been positive.

“Nobody is upset about having this out there,” he said. “They agree that, with conditions as such, we take all the measures we can.”

The declaration covers all unincorporated areas of Burnet County and prohibits all outdoor burning with only a few exceptions. Barbecue pits for commercial use may be used with wood or charcoal, and industrial projects underway before Jan. 1 can continue until completion. The order does not allow outdoor activities that might cause sparks or fire such as welding, cutting, grinders, or outdoor cooking.

jared@thepicayune.com

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