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5-year-old battling cancer made honorary Granite Shoals police officer

Isabella Solorzano and members of the Granite Shoals Police Department

Isabella Solorzano, a 5-year-old Granite Shoals resident who is battling cancer for the second time, poses for a photo with Granite Shoals police Capt. John Ortis (left), Capt. Chris Decker, Sgt. Allen Miley, Officer Josh Gomez, and Sgt. Chad Taliaferro Staff photo by Dakota Morrissiey

Isabella Solorzano, a 5-year-old Granite Shoals resident battling neuroblastoma for the second time, was made an honorary member of the Granite Shoals Police Department during the regular meeting of the City Council on Tuesday, Aug. 9.

Police Sgt. Allen Miley connected with the Solorzano family in 2020, when the Granite Shoals Police Officer’s Association held a brisket fundraiser to help with Isabella’s cancer treatment. Miley and the rest of the department rallied around the girl and her family.

Isabella’s first bout with cancer was an intermediate case of neuroblastoma, a cancer that emanates from immature nerve cells throughout the body. This form of cancer almost exclusively affects children 5 years and younger. She was first diagnosed at 3 years old.

“If you know Isabella, or if you don’t, she is probably the bravest and most courageous 5-year-old that you’re going to find,” said Granite Shoals Police Chief Gary Boshears.

Boshears presented Isabella with an honorary police badge, which Miley pinned on the girl. Dozens of members of the Solorzano family were present at City Hall for the ceremony.

Isabella Solorzano and Granite Shoals Police Sgt. Allen Miley
Isabella Solorzano, a 5-year-old resident of Granite Shoals, has an honorary officer’s badge pinned on by Granite Shoals Police Sgt. Allen Miley at the City Council meeting Aug. 9. Isabella is battling cancer for the second time. Staff photo by Dakota Morrissiey

Isabella was thought to have beaten her intermediate case of neuroblastoma, but it returned as high-risk neuroblastoma earlier this year. 

Isabella’s father, Orlando Solorzano, contacted Miley and let him know that her cancer had returned.

“It hit me a lot harder than I ever thought it could,” Miley said.

Orlando has been working two jobs to afford Isabella’s treatment, which she receives at Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth. Isabella’s mother, Gina Solorzano, has been by her side during treatment.

“I think she is taking everything really well, but the side effects do affect her,” Gina said. “She is a pretty happy little girl.”

Isabella is undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy to treat her high-risk neuroblastoma. These treatments can cause nausea, chemical burns, and hair loss.

Her treatment cycle should be completed by March or April of 2023. 

Miley referred to Isabella as a warrior battling against her cancer. He is a U.S. Marine and a four-year member of the Granite Shoals Police Department.

“A person who shows or has shown great vigor, courage, or aggressiveness,” said Miley, giving the definition of a warrior.

To learn more about Isabella and her battle with cancer, visit Isa’s Fight on Facebook.

dakota@thepicayune.com