Young Black Lives Matter organizers want to bring community closer

Black Lives Matter rally in Marble Falls

The teen organizers of an upcoming Black Lives Matter rally in Marble Falls enjoy a lighter moment as they plan the event. The Marble Falls area residents are Shyann Brown (left), Mauri Harris, and Bryce Laake. Supporting them is Monique Breaux (right). The event is 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, June 13, at Johnson Park. Staff photo by Daniel Clifton

Organizers of an upcoming Black Lives Matter demonstration in Marble Falls chose Saturday, June 13, as a date for a specific reason.

“On June 13, 1866, African-American citizens were considered citizens,” Bryce Laake explained. 

On that day, Congress passed the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, making “all persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to jurisdiction thereof” citizens. It was ratified two years later.

Laake and fellow organizers Mauri Harris and Shyann Brown are holding the demonstration from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 13, in Johnson Park, 230 Avenue J in Marble Falls. They spent several hours June 5 working out the details with the Marble Falls Police Department, members of the Marble Falls City Council, and local pastors. 

While a rumor has persisted of outsiders coming into city to create havoc, all three are from the Marble Falls area. They decided to hold the event to raise awareness of issues facing African-Americans and other minorities while also letting the community know they want to build a place where everyone is welcomed.

Brown explained that while the May 25 death of George Floyd while in police custody spurred them on, they are also holding the demonstration because of the bigotry they have faced.

“We decided to do a protest because we reflected on our own prejudice that happened to us and reflected on the past events of George Floyd, which motivated us to do this in our own community, where it actually effects us,” Brown said. “We’re doing a protest to bring people together as a united front to make a change where we live.”

They are also aware of some who have expressed concerns and fears over the demonstration. That’s the group of people Harris wants to reach.

“I don’t think it’s all about people coming together,” she said. “I think it’s about the people that aren’t coming together. I hope they get a change from seeing people come together. It’s not a riot. We’re not looting. It’s what it’s supposed to be like.”

This is one of the last things Harris will do in the Highland Lakes before reporting to U.S. Navy Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Illinois, for basic training. She’ll be the fourth generation in her family to serve in the military. (Read more about her story in the June edition of The Picayune Magazine.)

“It’s not just about this community. To me, it reached the world,” Harris added. 

The demonstration will feature a series of speakers, including local pastors and activists, as well as a prayer circle and lunch. Laake said it’s important to break bread together as a community.

The Marble Falls Police Department will be participating in the demonstration along with members of Marble Falls Fire Rescue, Marble Falls Area EMS, and Marble Falls city government. Mayor John Packer is expected to attend, organizers said.

All three expressed their gratitude and excitement to have so many local pastors, community leaders, the police, and others come out in support of them and the event. 

“I love the support,” Harris said. “If anything, it draws us closer together as a group.”

For more information about the Black Lives Matter demonstration, contact Monique Breaux at MarbleFallsPeacefulProtest@gmail.com.

daniel@thepicayune.com

9 thoughts on “Young Black Lives Matter organizers want to bring community closer

  1. So pleased our little place in the world wants to join in a peace walk for better race relations…I plan on attending…proud of these young folk for doing this. They need our support, glad the police are working with them.

    1. I am tired of the implication that if I am white I am a racist.
      I grew up in the sixties.
      Dr. King asked that a man be judged by his character, not the color of his skin.
      That is how I was raised.
      My father taught me to open a door for a lady, not just white ladies, all ladies.
      My final thought is:
      Am I expected to believe a the life of a looter matters? An arsonist? A person who assaults a policeman, firefighter or paramedic? Black or White?
      I suggest your community take a good hard look in the mirror before judging me.

      1. Floyd was no angel, but he was not a looter or arsonist and did not assault anyone. Are you saying his life did not matter because others did these things?

        And nobody here is calling you a racist. This is not about you.

  2. I will not be attending but I hope this group will at least be honest and tell people attending what the platform of BLM entails. Their demands call for reparations, a guaranteed livable wage for all black people, free college, defunding police departments so that black and brown can be free from what co founder Patrisse Cullors calls a “well funded army” that occupies them, redistribution of wealth and on and on. This information came from BLM.

    1. This “group” is a grass roots attempt by recent high school graduates to start the discussion about the injustice, bias, prejudice, and hate towards black people. It’s happening today in our community. Every day. That’s the platform. I pray that hearts and ears are opened so that we can bring about real change in our we treat other people. Real change so that a group of people don’t live in fear because of the color of their skin.

  3. What? A liveable wage AND a college education?? Shame on them for standing for such things! What an ignorant statement Karen!
    As far as the protest…I will be there! As well as most of my friends and co workers. Because we’re cool like that.

  4. We’re lucky to have these young people in our community. Change starts with each of us individually. I’ll be there on Saturday! And if you believe in justice and aren’t yet registered to vote, please do so!

  5. LOGAN: So pleased our little place in the world wants to join in a peace walk for better race relations
    Dr. King asked that a man be judged by his character, not the color of his skin.
    That is how I was raised.
    STERNBERG: My father taught me to open a door for a lady, not just white ladies, all ladies.
    WATKINS: Floyd was no angel, but he was not a looter or arsonist and did not assault anyone. Are you saying his life did not matter because others did these things?
    KAREN: I will not be attending but I hope this group will at least be honest and tell people attending what the platform of BLM entails.
    DAWN: Because we’re cool like that.
    JENN: I pray that hearts and ears are opened so that we can bring about real change in our we treat other people. Real change so that a group of people don’t live in fear because of the color of their skin.
    DASHNAW: We’re lucky to have these young people in our community. Change starts with each of us individually.

    ME: I highlight these points from these comments, because I read them as highlights of each one’s opinion being made of this article and can speak of any article under the United States First Amendment and put them in my comment to reflect a summary if this topic, GOD BLESS AMERICA, GOD BLESS THIS EARTH THAT THE GREAT LORD HAS GIVETH

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