Llano Parks Project pursues parks master plan for the city

The Badu Park splash pad in Llano was destroyed during the October flood. Insurance will help cover the cost to replace the attraction, but what the Llano Parks Project really wants is a comprehensive parks master plan to ensure that any additions to the city’s parks system is done with the best long-term planning in mind. File photo

The Badu Park splash pad in Llano was destroyed during the October flood. Insurance will help cover the cost to replace the attraction, but what the Llano Parks Project really wants is a comprehensive parks master plan to ensure that any additions to the city’s parks system is done with the best long-term planning in mind. File photo

STAFF WRITER JARED FIELDS

After the October flood destroyed the new Badu Park splash pad, you might expect a new one to be at the top of a wish list for the Llano Parks Project.

Instead, the nonprofit organization has a much bigger item in mind: a comprehensive master plan for all current and potential parks in Llano.

The total cost for such a plan comes to $65,500 and is broken down into five parts.

The Llano Parks Project has the funds for Phase 1, which is $3,640, according to Julie Leverett, board president.

“If somebody was excited enough to be able to help start the second phase, that would be fantastic,” Leverett said.

The Phase 2 subtotal is $16,740, if you happen to have your checkbook ready.

A comprehensive master plan would help lay out a large overview of the city’s parks to tie them together. The Llano Parks Project has insurance funds to help pay for the replacement cost of the splash pad, but without an overall master plan, the city and organization might not be working in the best long-term interests of the parks system.

Phase 2 includes the public engagement of the master plan, including focus groups, public events, and open houses to gather input.

Phase 3 includes drafting the parks master plan documents, taking an inventory of current parks, and assessing needs. The Phase 3 cost is about $23,340.

Phase 4 includes concept planning and programming recommendations at a cost of $15,560.

The Llano Parks Project is working to raise money to pay for the plan and present it to Llano City Council for consideration.

“Then, this would be our master plan to go off of whenever we’re creating something new or doing any development,” Leverett said.

Adopting the plan, at a cost of about $5,700, is Phase 5.

Although the Llano Parks Project is a nonprofit organization separate from the city’s parks department, Leverett said everything the organization does is with the city.

“We have to do this in partnership with the city,” she said. “We wouldn’t be able to do anything if it wasn’t for the city.”

The Llano Parks Project’s yearly fundraiser, the Antler Drop Derby, is coming up March 2 at The Ramblin’ Rose in Llano.

The fourth annual event will include dinner, entertainment, raffles, games, and a live auction. Ticket information is available on the Llano Parks Project website.

jared@thepicayune.com

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