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Is extreme weather in extended forecast? Meteorologist presents program

A satellite image of Hurricane Harvey, which hit the Texas coast in August 2017 during a year of extreme weather. Is it an anomaly or a sign of things to come? Courtesy photo

A satellite image of Hurricane Harvey, which hit the Texas coast in August 2017 during a year of extreme weather. Is it an anomaly or a sign of things to come? Courtesy photo

FROM STAFF REPORTS

MARBLE FALLS — With Hurricane Harvey wreaking havoc on the Texas Gulf Coast followed by Hurricane Irma ravaging Puerto Rico, Florida, and parts of the southeast, 2017 closed as a year of extreme weather events.

Harvey made three landfalls by the time it was done with the Texas coast and left destruction in its wake.

Is 2017 an anomaly or a sign of things to come?

Paul Yura, warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service, will delve into a possible answer with his presentation, “Extreme Weather in 2017, Will It Continue?” He’ll give the program during the Highland Lakes Birding and Wildflower Society meeting Thursday, Feb. 1, at the Marble Falls Public Library, 101 Main St.

The meeting starts at 9:30 a.m. with a meet-and-greet followed by the program at 10 a.m. It’s open to the public.

Yura will discuss the past year in weather, especially Hurricane Harvey, while also casting an eye to the future since many people are asking, “Is the weather really getting worse?” He’ll use compelling photos and images of weather incidents, including of Hurricane Harvey.

Several society members will gather at the library at 8:30 a.m. before the meeting for a bird walk around the area. A member with knowledge of local birds often leads the walk. The public is invited.

editor@thepicayune.com