Burnet County commissioners join fight against proposed rock crusher

STAFF WRITER CONNIE SWINNEY

A proposed rock crushing plant (highlighted in red) in the southwest corner of U.S. 281 and Texas 71. Courtesy map

A proposed rock crushing plant (highlighted in red) in the southwest corner of U.S. 281 and Texas 71. Courtesy map

MARBLE FALLS — Burnet County commissioners have joined the fight against a proposed rock crusher operation just south of the U.S. 281-Texas 71 intersection.

Commissioners approved the draft of a letter Tuesday, Sept. 26, asking the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for a so-called “contested case hearing” in connection with Asphalt Inc.’s air quality permit.

“This request is also reflective of, and validating, the concerns expressed by the cities of Marble Falls and Horseshoe Bay,” the letter stated.

Both municipalities drafted similar statements against the project.

Community leaders and nearby residents contend the operation will cause issues with air quality, traffic, and economic development.

Opponents have scheduled a protest at 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 30, at the intersection of CR 403, just off U.S. 281 south of the Texas 71 intersection.

The TCEQ public commenting period and hearing request deadline is Monday, Oct. 9.

Click HERE to offer comments.

connie@thepicayune.com

17 Responses to “Burnet County commissioners join fight against proposed rock crusher”

  1. steve says:

    A portion of that land is in blanco county right next to Round mountain and the southern most tip is where the permit claims it is to be located. The land shown is two seperate parcels. Two seperate property id numbers. It looks to me like those opposing this plant are doing so under the assumption that both tracts of land are going to be used for the operation.
    Also since when did all the burnet commissioners get power over anything outside their respective districts. Pct4 commissioner can say something but the other 3?

    • Candice says:

      Steve those of us that are opposing it are from all over the area and for many many reasons. This affects a lot of us, not just the entrance, and not just the hospital.

      And to everyone claiming it’s bringing jobs to the area-if you’re looking for a job please let me know because we have tried hiring for months now and no one has come in to apply compared to just a year ago. We have too many jobs and not enough people apparently…..so the fact that people are using that as an excuse is beyond me.

      The traffic issue this will bring to our area is also a huge problem. Unless you live off of county road 403, you don’t understand what we go through. We all risk our lives on a daily basis just to turn onto our road, and it will only get worse. I’m sure the asphalt trucks will be using CR 403 as well.

      • steve says:

        Candice I understand all to well about the traffic issues as I have dealt with an unsafe location into my subdivision closer to town. There is no middle divider lane to get in to have a safe left turn. Every area south of 71 will get worse traffic wise if one is not installed there as well. They seem to be ok letting subdivisions pop up in that area which will increase traffic problems too.
        As far as the jobs coming. There are many reasons why the ones here may not be getting filled. A lot of times it’s pay scale.

    • CLA says:

      8.3 acres out of 518 acres are in Blanco. Plant site is a mile and half deep into the 518 acres, which is ALL in Burnet County. The only rock available on this ranch is North of the crushing location which puts the quarry almost directly across Hwy 71 from the hospital.

      • steve says:

        Do you have a site plan showing where the main crusher will sit? Just because the best rocks are farther up in the ranch does not mean that’s where they will get crushed at. They can be hauled from one spot to the next. Dig from one spot and crush in another.

        • CLA says:

          There is a map available with the City. It is marked where the plant will be located. As I mentioned above, the plant (crushing facility) is a mile and half deep into the 518 acres. The quarry (site of digging) is north of that. I do believe that is TWO separate locations. Both locations (plant & quarry) are TOO CLOSE TO THE HOSPITAL. The company should be ashamed for even considering building a plant in this location.

          • steve says:

            If you go to the city website they do have a quick link to where the approximate location is but all they have is a flag icon. I did not see any site plans. Merely placing a marker on a map does not give true clarity with the plants intentions. IMO it makes the city look deceptive.

  2. MM says:

    It is a shame that Spicewood has never received this support to prevent the cement plants that have sprouted up all around us. There was quite an opposition to a plant in Spicewood, TCEQ apparently allowed the license without question until the opposition, ultimately it proceeded. I know the reply will be that Spicewood is not incorporated, etc. But we are part of the county and we pay taxes and we have property values being affected. Shame on TCEQ. This deserves a dedicated effort by the county to prevent the ruin of our beautiful hill country and Lake Travis, to preserve the same things of concern: air quality, traffic, and economic development.

  3. Texas22Step says:

    As someone who lives across from an existing rock quarry and crushing operation on TX-71, those of you who talk about “digging” rock out have no idea. There are regular blasting operations to fragment rock for crushing. This is very noisy for miles around, as well as unsettling to any who hear it. Imagine being a hospital patient and suddenly hearing a loud blast across the highway, then having a shock wave from the blast arrive a few seconds later. This is just not the location for a quarry / crushing operation. They should find some rock elsewhere — I think there is plenty of it around the Hill Country.

    • steve says:

      You say it’s very noisy for miles around and then mention the hospital. Do you know that Huber mining on 281 does underground blasting at 5am in the morning and is 2 1/2 miles away. Does the hospital feel the shock wave? I know what it feels like when they blast at 5am. The distance from huber to the hospital is very close to this new one that wants to go up.

      • Candice says:

        Steve you say you know what it feels like, I’m assuming you work for these people since you are all over the place commenting on all of these posts arguing with everyone and debating us. Kinda makes your comments invalid honestly because you’re completely biased. I could sit here and list a million reasons why I disagree with you, but it doesn’t seem like you’re ever going to hear us so I won’t bother.

  4. John Galt says:

    Laws are not established just to keep a company from being irresponsible when it comes to the environment. Laws are also there to protect a person (or a company) from the mob of ignorance that wish to exert their will, or the “tyranny of the masses.”

    The company likely intends to make a large financial investment in this operation, and the law is there to protect its right to use the land however it wishes, given it follows the rules established by governing law.

    The only way to insure against development “in your back yard” which is hardly the case here, is to live further away, or buy more land yourself. You can not have your cake (pristine countryside) and eat it too (wish for economic growth in the area).

    • Sarah says:

      Talking about 2 different things. We care about responsible economic growth. We are all making an investment in the area. Your growth at any price usually ends up with EPA Superfund years later. We can all tolerate a train or a mill like Atlas Shrugged. There is a difference btn a mill & a train and a rock quarry with blasting. This will devalue our investments & probably have long term effects on our health. Please be respectful of Ayn Rand. Ayn Rand never intended for citizens to suffer for the sake of industry. We will not be able to sell our land now that this has begun. Your comments are irresponsible.

      • steve says:

        Sarah. Why would you not be able to sell your land if the quarry goes in? There will always be buyers for dirt. There will always be a developer willing to do something with it.

  5. Spleef says:

    Steve appears to be either an employee of the entity trying to get the crushing plant there or else is paid by them to make these statements to attempt to downplay the reality of the crystaline silicate, a known carcinigen when suspended in the air and breathed by living beings. Me thinkss he should be careful where he steps while here in our territory.

    • El Jay says:

      Spleef appears to be a keyboard Tarzan. There is always a “tough guy” in the group.

    • steve says:

      Spleef. Not an employee and not paid. Hmm so you thinks I should be careful in your territory eh. Lol. Maybe you should go tell that to the companies putting these plants in or better yet tell it to the ones already set up.

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